Magical girl!Fefetasprite & Editing: chisha
Photography: dontraynamyparade
Design: aradiyeah

fefetasprite homestuck

chavisory:

into-the-weeds:

Don’t give me super-soliders with super-senses if you’re not going to give them super-sensory-overload.

Do you know what having that much hearing does to someone???

THANK YOU.

brigadierbri:

but imagine if Lian’s existence wasn’t erased in New 52

Jason would have assured Roy that Lian hadn’t died hating him because he didn’t die hating Bruce either

yamiyuugis:

theaubisticagenda:

commanderfraya:

commanderfraya:

ok but:  child autistic prince zuko stimming with firebending and accidentally burning things down

u think im joking but nothing is as important as autistic prince zuko

  • autistic zuko who cant for the life of him figure out why he has so much trouble communicating n struggling with some super anxiety over it bc that’s canon
  • autistic zuko who attaches so much importance to his honor bc he’s terrified he won’t be worth anything without it (also canon)
  • autistic zuko figuring out how to relate to other people in a way that doesnt make him sound like a raging dick all the time (canon)
  • autistic zuko not being sure what to do about friendships and actually being loved (canon)
  • autistic zuko learning that his destiny is his own and evolves independently of the tyranny of the fire nation and doing his best to make up for his past mistakes (canon)
  • autistic zuko scripting conversations before having them and trying fifteen different ways to say the same thing (canon)

like pls make room for autistic zuko interpretations in ur life this is something that was only revealed to me like two days ago but is so important

autistic zuko’s older sister being a giant dick to him and not presuming his competence (canon)

autistic zuko having developmental delays in being able to firebend and not learning how until years after he was expected to & being abused for it (canon)

*azula is zukos younger sister btw

thomas4th:

sputnikcentury:

Important insight from Mr. Elba.

PACIFIC RIM 2: DUCK PUNT

thomas4th:

sputnikcentury:

Important insight from Mr. Elba.

PACIFIC RIM 2: DUCK PUNT

importantbirds:

«Oh my god SHUT THE FUCK UP MARCO»

importantbirds:

«Oh my god SHUT THE FUCK UP MARCO»

ikimaru:


Anon: is Aradia ready for the spooky scary skeletons and ghosts?

you bet she is B)
party at Terezi’s with spooky remix hehe

ikimaru:

Anon: is Aradia ready for the spooky scary skeletons and ghosts?

you bet she is B)

party at Terezi’s with spooky remix hehe

"I believe the ten commandments were written by a man and not a god because somehow “Don’t fuck my wife” is on there and not “Don’t commit rape”."

Me (via roarkshop)

Damn! Damn! DAMN!!! Oh my gosh!

(via spirituallygeeky)

Ah yeah

(via girldwarf)

burymeinyellowhenidie:

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential
When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.
But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.
Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.
The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.
Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.
From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”
“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.
While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.
When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.
“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.
A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.
“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”
Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.
“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.
As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.
The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.
Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.
Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses
Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.
Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

Mexicellence!

burymeinyellowhenidie:

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential

When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.

But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.

Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.

The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.

Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.

From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”

“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.

While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.

When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.

“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.

A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.

“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”

Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.

“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.

As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.

The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.

Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.

Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.

Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.

Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

Mexicellence!

theslinkylizard:

myblackeyeddemon:

theslinkylizard:

Baby got a bath today~

How did you get a dinosaur

image

This is my child! Please ask your parents about the dino and the egg!!!

greenekangaroo:

sweaterkittensahoy:

Deadpool Annual (2014) #2

I am literally just sitting here with my mouth hanging open.

Deadpool: 

1) is capable of human relationships, be they romantic, platonic, or anywhere in between. 

2) considers Spiderman his friend, even if Peter’s a little leery on the subject.

3) Would kill for his friends. Has killed for his friends.

4) Is awesome. 

fishingboatproceeds:

water:

Via fishingboatproceeds:

During my time in Ethiopia, I met many people who rely on health care outposts like the one seen in the bottom two pictures here. Through these outposts, children and families get vaccines, diagnoses, and treatment for diseases like diarrhea and pneumonia.

But most of these families, and most of their health care facilities, don’t have regular access to clean water. When I asked people about their greatest needs, almost all of them—from the Women’s Health Army volunteers to children—cited clean water first.

More than 45 million Ethiopians live without clean water. I spoke to women who walk miles every other day with heavy jerrycans to get drinking water for their families. The people I met explained how lack of clean water is a health problem, a financial problem, and a family problem.

So for the next week nerdfighteria is teaming up with water.org to raise money to build sustainable wells so that more than 4,000 people in Ethiopia can have clean water. Please join me in donating—or, if you can’t, in spreading the word. Thanks, and DFTBA.

Water.org thanks John Green for his continued support.

That’s a pretty sweet tumblr username, water.org. I can’t believe you guys got “water” and I’m stuck with “fishingboatproceeds.” 

MORE IMPORTANTLY, IF WE GET TO $100,000 BILL GATES WILL MATCH OUR DONATION AND $8,000 PEOPLE IN RURAL ETHIOPIA WILL GET ACCESS TO SAFE WATER THROUGH NEW WELLS. We’ve already raised over $16,000. Thanks, and keep spreading the word!

becausebirds:

thebeardeddan87:

Odin being pampered.

one green sweater bird plz

grrspit:

ipomoeaj:

jean-luc-gohard:

the-goddamazon:

We know why.

Don’t forget Charlie Sheen. He’s been arrested for domestic violence at least six times and shot a woman. With a gun. And he’s still got a career.

Sean Penn tied Madonna to a chair and beat her. Fuck him. Fuck all of them.

Michael Fassbender
Matthew Fox
John Lennon
Paul McCartney
Ringo too I’m pretty sure
Phil Spector, although he’s now in jail for killing a lady he beat on Ronnie Spector for years and still got into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
Axl Rose
Vince Neil
Sean Penn
Charlie Sheen
Jim Morrison tried to set fire to his girlfriend
Stephen Segal
Tommy Lee
Ozzy Osbourne
Mickey Rourke
Bill Murray
Gary Busey
Tom Sizemore
Christian Slater
James Caan
Josh Brolin
Edward Furlong
I could go on.
The point isn’t that the men on the left don’t deserve everything bad they have coming to them.  The point is where the fuck is all the outrage when the men on the right do it.  So many of our pop culture heroes are abusers and nobody seems to care.
Like, even if we’re gonna stick to the NFL, Ben Roethlisberger patiently sat out his six game suspension for rape and continued on with his career with little outrage. 
If we’re really going to care now about ostracizing perpetrators of domestic violence, we got a lotta slack to pick up.

grrspit:

ipomoeaj:

jean-luc-gohard:

the-goddamazon:

We know why.

Don’t forget Charlie Sheen. He’s been arrested for domestic violence at least six times and shot a woman. With a gun. And he’s still got a career.

Sean Penn tied Madonna to a chair and beat her. Fuck him. Fuck all of them.

Michael Fassbender

Matthew Fox

John Lennon

Paul McCartney

Ringo too I’m pretty sure

Phil Spector, although he’s now in jail for killing a lady he beat on Ronnie Spector for years and still got into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Axl Rose

Vince Neil

Sean Penn

Charlie Sheen

Jim Morrison tried to set fire to his girlfriend

Stephen Segal

Tommy Lee

Ozzy Osbourne

Mickey Rourke

Bill Murray

Gary Busey

Tom Sizemore

Christian Slater

James Caan

Josh Brolin

Edward Furlong

I could go on.

The point isn’t that the men on the left don’t deserve everything bad they have coming to them.  The point is where the fuck is all the outrage when the men on the right do it.  So many of our pop culture heroes are abusers and nobody seems to care.

Like, even if we’re gonna stick to the NFL, Ben Roethlisberger patiently sat out his six game suspension for rape and continued on with his career with little outrage. 

If we’re really going to care now about ostracizing perpetrators of domestic violence, we got a lotta slack to pick up.

i didn't even know about most of those fuuuuuuck fuck this shit
cornflakepizza:

OH THANK GOD

cornflakepizza:

OH THANK GOD

theme